M. Shaheer Niazi - Born To Science

"Science travelled a long way to reach me. The journey starts with my grandfather, Abdur Rehman Khan Niazi.

He rented out books of maths and physics and sat in the streets of anarkali going through them, absorbing as much knowledge as he could. His immense passion for science and mathematics led him towards becoming a structural engineer, the more obvious and straightforward use of the subjects in a career.

He ended up doing the structural designs of the Minar-e-Pakistan & fortress stadium among other popular buildings we see everyday in our city of lahore.

The science bug was transferred on from him to my father, Ahmad ur Rehman Khan Niazi. He followed in his fathers footsteps and also read as much as he could from the books around him. His interest in science converged towards astronomy and then wanting to become an astronaut. The more obvious and straightforward path available for him was to become a pilot instead. To be as close as possible yet equally far to space.

 

Then the bug was finally transferred onto me, in the same way as it had been before. But I am yet to see, what path it leads me to."


Muhammad Shaheer Khan Niazi was only 16-year-old when he broke the record of Sir Isaac Newton by becoming the youngest scientist to get his study published in the prestigious Royal Open Science Journal, Niazi found a way to photograph the movement of ions, which form a honeycomb shape when electrically charged particles are passed through a pool of oil.

His study has been published in the prestigious Royal Open Science Journal, making him the youngest in the world to have a published research paper.

‘’Newton was 17 when his first research paper was published in the same journal’